Henry Rollins - Young Person

Sad day, Levon Helm, backbone of The Band passed away of cancer. Appreciate his music, make the journey to the “basement tapes”! http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3LAcP_v-j3I&feature=youtube_gdata_player

Jeremy Lin (Taken with instagram)

Jeremy Lin (Taken with instagram)

Blue line (Taken with instagram)

Blue line (Taken with instagram)

Taken with instagram

Taken with instagram

Start time (Taken with instagram)

Start time (Taken with instagram)

Great feeling being under the bright lights…  (Taken with instagram)

Great feeling being under the bright lights… (Taken with instagram)

2543 In a 5-4 decision, Supreme Court rules that people arrested for any offense, no matter how minor, can be strip-searched during processing

6 Senators Who Voted To Protect Oil Tax Breaks Received $23,582,500 From Big Oil: In a 51-47 vote, 43 Senate Republicans and 4 Democrats filibustered to protect $24 billion in tax breaks for Big Oil (via Reddit)

fuckyeahlatinamericanhistory:

Did you know that the late Jean-Michel Basquiat had a Haitian father and a Puerto Rican mother?

fuckyeahlatinamericanhistory:

Did you know that the late Jean-Michel Basquiat had a Haitian father and a Puerto Rican mother?

(Source: artismyhustle, via fylatinamericanhistory)

Did ‘Mass Effect’ Solve The Fermi Paradox?

jtotheizzoe:

The Fermi Paradox, or “Where Is Everybody?” … did a video game come up with the best answer yet?

When it comes to finding other intelligent life in a universe as old as ours, the Fermi Paradox is a particularly tough puzzle. Probability says there should be a huge number of intelligent civilizations, but why, even after billions of years of various supposed beyond-Earth planetary evolutions, has no one contacted us?

They’re clearly just waiting out there to harvest our civilization as soon as we get far enough from home? Or something. I haven’t played video games in a while. From Caleb Scharf’s take:

Without going into all the colorful details, the central premise is that a hugely advanced and ancient race of artificially intelligent machines ‘harvests’ all sentient, space-faring life in the Milky Way every 50,000 years. These machines otherwise lie dormant out in the depths of intergalactic space. They have constructed and positioned an ingenious web of technological devices (including the Mass Effectrelays, providing rapid interstellar travel) and habitats within the Galaxy that effectively sieve through the rising civilizations, helping the successful flourish and multiply, ripening them up for eventual culling. The reason for this? Well, the plot is complex and somewhat ambiguous, but one thing that these machines do is use the genetic slurry of millions, billions of individuals from a species to create new versions of themselves.

It’s a grand ol’ piece of sci-fi opera, but it also provides a neat solution to the Fermi Paradox via a number of ideas: a) The most truly advanced interstellar species spends most of its time out of the Galaxy in hibernation. b) Purging all other sentient (space-faring) life every 50,000 years puts a stop to any great spreading across the Galaxy. c) Sentient, space-faring species are inevitably drawn into the technological lures and habitats left for them, and so are less inclined to explore.

These make it very unlikely that until a species is capable of at least proper interplanetary space travel (in the game humans have to reach Mars to become aware of what’s going on at all) it will have to conclude that the Galaxy is a lonely place.

(via seymourbuhts)

paradiscacorbasi:

unappreciatednoirbeauties:

robrogers:

Trayvon Martin - 27 Mar 2012

Sad truth

When you got political cartoonists noticing,  it can no longer be blown off as just  ”isolated incidents”. 

paradiscacorbasi:

unappreciatednoirbeauties:

robrogers:

Trayvon Martin - 27 Mar 2012

Sad truth

When you got political cartoonists noticing,  it can no longer be blown off as just  ”isolated incidents”. 

(via seymourbuhts)

thinkmexican:

Mexican Engineering: A Model for Earthquake Preparedness
It’s been a week since Mexico City was hit by a magnitude 7.4 earthquake, the strongest to strike Mexico in over 25 years.
Remarkably, there were no deaths and only two injuries in the entire city. However, two people did die near the quake’s epicenter of Ometepec, Guerrero.
For Mexican engineers, this quake was a special opportunity to test their work.
By all accounts, they passed. In fact, some are calling Mexico City a model for preparedness in the developing world.
A salute to Mexican engineering!
Read: Earthquake Tests 25 Years of Mexican Engineering - Nature

thinkmexican:

Mexican Engineering: A Model for Earthquake Preparedness

It’s been a week since Mexico City was hit by a magnitude 7.4 earthquake, the strongest to strike Mexico in over 25 years.

Remarkably, there were no deaths and only two injuries in the entire city. However, two people did die near the quake’s epicenter of Ometepec, Guerrero.

For Mexican engineers, this quake was a special opportunity to test their work.

By all accounts, they passed. In fact, some are calling Mexico City a model for preparedness in the developing world.

A salute to Mexican engineering!

Read: Earthquake Tests 25 Years of Mexican Engineering - Nature

(Source: thinkmexican, via ohstella)